Inside PR
Inside PR is a weekly podcast about social media and public relations. Agency veterans Martin Waxman, Gini Dietrich and Joseph Thornley co-host the show. Each week, they take a look under the hood of the public relations/social media industries, explore topical and provocative issues, discuss listener comments, and even interview an interesting guest or two. Inside PR welcomes and depends on listener comments to ensure the continuing relevance of the show. Listeners can comment directly on the podcast blog at www.insidepr.ca or, even better, send in an audio comment to insideprcomments@gmail.com. If you’re already a business communicator or are looking to break into public relations, or even if you’re in another field but understand that communications, reputation, and image make and break organizations, listen to Inside PR.

Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman and Joseph Thornley are back with another episode of the Inside PR podcast. This week, we discuss: #IPRMustKnow Instagram Stories continues to attract publisher interest. It could well be the combination of an engaging experience meeting a pre-existing audience. Blab shut down, abruptly. Another sign that the psychology of scale has beat out the idea of sustainability for many business founders? For sure, it's another reminder of the danger of placing your content eggs in any single shared space. Unless you promote it, they will not come Gini Dietrich schooled Joe on the importance and method of promoting content when she interviewed him for the Spin Sucks Inquisition. Within minutes of the post going live, Joe started to see mentions on his Twitter feed. Over the next week, he watched Gini promote the video. But beyond that, he watched Gini's network chime in and share it. So, this week, we discuss Gini's approach to promoting content, an approach which enables her to leverage a large and interested community of interest. Listen to the end for this week's outtake You know that we're not polished in our presentation. And if you heard us before the show is edited, you'd know that even better. But we genuinely like one another and have fun doing the show. Occasionally, this shows through in what we don't include in the final version. Listen to the very end to get a taste of the stuff we leave on the cutting room floor. We hope you like the podcast as much as we like making it for you.

Direct download: IPR453.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:18am EDT

Inside PR 452: Does the hub and spoke model need a tire change?

A recent Ontario arbitrator's ruling reminds us that the law and social media are in an ever-changing relationship. The Olympics' once again aggressively enforce trademarks on social media. Instagram Stories are feeling good. And the trend to distributed publishing prompts a rethink of the hub and spoke content publishing model. Join Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman and Joseph Thornley as they discuss these topics on this week’s Inside PR podcast. #IPRMustKnow Employers' social media responsibilities are fluid You may think that social media has been around long enough that you're comfortable that you know what you should, can and must do when interacting on social media for your employer or client. Well, an Arbitrator's ruling in a dispute between the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) and the union representing its employees should remind us that nothing is fixed when it comes to social media. As reported in the Toronto Star, the Arbitrator ruled that the TTC, when operating @TTCHelps, its Twitter outreach ID, failed to take all of the measure it should have to protect its employees from online harassment and abuse. The union argued that, by operating its customer service Twitter ID, @TTCHelps, the TTC was providing a forum for abuse and harassment of its employees. While the arbitrator did not support the union's demand to shut down the account, he did indicate that the TTC be more assertive, telling people to take down posts, images, etc. considered offensive to employees, blocking Twitter uses and requesting Twitter to close the accounts of those users who do not cooperate. We have a good discussion about this ruling. Regardless of which side you come down on, this is a reminder to be ready to revise your practices on social media. The law still is being made. Olympic-sized trademark enforcement says its about big money more than athletics It's become a tradition. Noting the hyper-aggressive trademark enforcement surrounding the Olympics and the use of any of their registered terms. Small businesses need to keep themselves as safe as the larger entities. And that's just not fun. Instagram Stories make a good social media platform even better Gini has been posting to Instagram stories daily, and she reports that it's a much simpler, intuitive experience than posting to Snapchat. Simpler. Intuitive. A solid foundation for success. Does the hub and spoke need a tire change? The hub and spoke approach to creating, distributing and promoting content has been a best practice for several years. However, after hearing that 75% of the content Buzzfeed produces isn't published on Buzzfeed.com, Martin wonders if it's time for marketers to reassess the role of the hub. Gini and Joe aren't quite ready to abandon their blogs, but they agree with Martin that we need to challenge our accepted practices.

Direct download: IPR452.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:42am EDT

Inside PR 452: Does the hub and spoke model need a tire change?

A recent Ontario arbitrator's ruling reminds us that the law and social media are in an ever-changing relationship. The Olympics' once again aggressively enforce trademarks on social media. Instagram Stories are feeling good. And the trend to distributed publishing prompts a rethink of the hub and spoke content publishing model. Join Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman and Joseph Thornley as they discuss these topics on this week’s Inside PR podcast. #IPRMustKnow Employers' social media responsibilities are fluid You may think that social media has been around long enough that you're comfortable that you know what you should, can and must do when interacting on social media for your employer or client. Well, an Arbitrator's ruling in a dispute between the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) and the union representing its employees should remind us that nothing is fixed when it comes to social media. As reported in the Toronto Star, the Arbitrator ruled that the TTC, when operating @TTCHelps, its Twitter outreach ID, failed to take all of the measure it should have to protect its employees from online harassment and abuse. The union argued that, by operating its customer service Twitter ID, @TTCHelps, the TTC was providing a forum for abuse and harassment of its employees. While the arbitrator did not support the union's demand to shut down the account, he did indicate that the TTC be more assertive, telling people to take down posts, images, etc. considered offensive to employees, blocking Twitter uses and requesting Twitter to close the accounts of those users who do not cooperate. We have a good discussion about this ruling. Regardless of which side you come down on, this is a reminder to be ready to revise your practices on social media. The law still is being made. Olympic-sized trademark enforcement says its about big money more than athletics It's become a tradition. Noting the hyper-aggressive trademark enforcement surrounding the Olympics and the use of any of their registered terms. Small businesses need to keep themselves as safe as the larger entities. And that's just not fun. Instagram Stories make a good social media platform even better Gini has been posting to Instagram stories daily, and she reports that it's a much simpler, intuitive experience than posting to Snapchat. Simpler. Intuitive. A solid foundation for success. Does the hub and spoke need a tire change? The hub and spoke approach to creating, distributing and promoting content has been a best practice for several years. However, after hearing that 75% of the content Buzzfeed produces isn't published on Buzzfeed.com, Martin wonders if it's time for marketers to reassess the role of the hub. Gini and Joe aren't quite ready to abandon their blogs, but they agree with Martin that we need to challenge our accepted practices.

Direct download: IPR452.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:41am EDT

Inside PR 452: Does the hub and spoke model need a tire change?

A recent Ontario arbitrator's ruling reminds us that the law and social media are in an ever-changing relationship. The Olympics' once again aggressively enforce trademarks on social media. Instagram Stories are feeling good. And the trend to distributed publishing prompts a rethink of the hub and spoke content publishing model. Join Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman and Joseph Thornley as they discuss these topics on this week’s Inside PR podcast. #IPRMustKnow Employers' social media responsibilities are fluid You may think that social media has been around long enough that you're comfortable that you know what you should, can and must do when interacting on social media for your employer or client. Well, an Arbitrator's ruling in a dispute between the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) and the union representing its employees should remind us that nothing is fixed when it comes to social media. As reported in the Toronto Star, the Arbitrator ruled that the TTC, when operating @TTCHelps, its Twitter outreach ID, failed to take all of the measure it should have to protect its employees from online harassment and abuse. The union argued that, by operating its customer service Twitter ID, @TTCHelps, the TTC was providing a forum for abuse and harassment of its employees. While the arbitrator did not support the union's demand to shut down the account, he did indicate that the TTC be more assertive, telling people to take down posts, images, etc. considered offensive to employees, blocking Twitter uses and requesting Twitter to close the accounts of those users who do not cooperate. We have a good discussion about this ruling. Regardless of which side you come down on, this is a reminder to be ready to revise your practices on social media. The law still is being made. Olympic-sized trademark enforcement says its about big money more than athletics It's become a tradition. Noting the hyper-aggressive trademark enforcement surrounding the Olympics and the use of any of their registered terms. Small businesses need to keep themselves as safe as the larger entities. And that's just not fun. Instagram Stories make a good social media platform even better Gini has been posting to Instagram stories daily, and she reports that it's a much simpler, intuitive experience than posting to Snapchat. Simpler. Intuitive. A solid foundation for success. Does the hub and spoke need a tire change? The hub and spoke approach to creating, distributing and promoting content has been a best practice for several years. However, after hearing that 75% of the content Buzzfeed produces isn't published on Buzzfeed.com, Martin wonders if it's time for marketers to reassess the role of the hub. Gini and Joe aren't quite ready to abandon their blogs, but they agree with Martin that we need to challenge our accepted practices.

Direct download: IPR452.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 10:40am EDT

Twitter opens verification to everyone. Yahoo closes an era. Anthony Ponce is a backseat rider. And the New York Times Public Editor shines a spotlight on the importance of perceived bias. Join Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman and Joseph Thornley as they discuss these topics on this week's Inside PR podcast. #IPRMustKnow RIP Yahoo Yahoo once was the directory of the internet. So, we couldn't let it fade into oblivion without marking the event. Verify me, Twitter It has been a widely-coveted symbol - the Twitter blue verification check mark. Now, we all can apply for it. Many will be called, but few will be granted? Have you applied for Twitter verification under the new process? Has your application been approved? Backseat Rider Anthony Ponce left his job as an on-air news anchor to spend full-time driving tax and posting the stories he picks up to his Facebook page. An interesting experiment. Politicians long have known that the best briefing they could get when visiting a city is the discussion with the taxi driver. They go everywhere and see everything. Bias in News Media Redux This is the issue we live with on a day by day basis. It's also something which viewers of Fox News seem to accept, even welcome. Liz Spayd, the recently-appointed Public Editor at the New York Times reminds us that perception and reality do not necessarily converge when it comes to the issue of bias in news coverage. We've talked a lot about bias and personal perspective. And Spayd's column brings us back to this topic.

Direct download: IPR451.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:22pm EDT

PostGhost, a service that preserved deleted tweets, was told to cease doing this by Twitter. PostGhost complied and shut down its service. But it did not go quietly. They published an Open Letter to Twitter, arguing that the deleted tweets of people with very large followings could have as much impact on public issues as the tweets of politicians. Citing deleted tweets about the Brexit vote by British celebrities with large followings, they say, "the ability to reach millions of followers instantly and leave no trace is a massive and growing power, and one that is currently completely unchecked and undocumented." The PostGhost letter raises important issues that have been debated before and will continue to be debated. And once Gini raised it, we too found ourselves debating it - for the entire episode. So, this is a single episode about one thing that raises a number of important issues. We hope you find it interesting and useful.

Direct download: IPR450.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:49pm EDT

Inside PR 449: Here and App. There and App. Everywhere an App.

Snapchat is more than ephemeral with Memories. Pokemon Go rules the world. And we pick up on Walt Mossberg's discussion of our fragmented messaging environment. Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman and Joseph Thornley tackle these topics and more in this week’s Inside PR podcast. #IPRMustKnow Snapchat Memories for when ephemeral isn't enough Hard on the heels of news that Snapchat has surpassed Twitter in daily users, we say Snapchat switch from its ephemeral-always model to provide users with the ability to save their Snaps using a new feature, Snapchat Memories. Memories lets you save current and previous Snaps and then use them for future stories. So, now you never need to worry people missing that embarrassing photo of your best friend that you sent out 25 hours ago. You can reach into Memories, add the photo to a new story, and start the cycle all over again. Pokemon Go Goes Like virtually everyone else this past week, we have been entranced by Pokemon Go. For its privacy implications. And because it has brought the potential of augmented reality to the masses. It may be a fad. But it's a fad that will have made a difference. Here an App. There an App. Everywhere an App It was simple in the days of email: Just settle on your client - Outlook, AOL… and then add all your email accounts to access them in one place. Today, as we spend more of our time on chat, with proprietary, non-interchangeable standards, we are again facing the need to switch constantly between apps - for social networks, for chat. Pain the butt? We riff on a theme recently explored by Walt Mossberg in a blog post, The Tyranny of Messaging and Notifications, and on his podcast, Ctrl-Walt-Delete.

Direct download: IPR449.mp3
Category:PR -- posted at: 7:54am EDT

Inside PR 448: Integrate This!

Twitter brings easy analytics to your mobile device. YouTube plays catch up in livestreaming video. And we ask why, after all these years, integrated marketing communications isn't the norm. Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman and Joseph Thornley tackle these topics and more in this week’s Inside PR podcast. #IPRMustKnow Twitter Engage brings Twitter analytics to the masses Twitter just made it a whole lot easier to track analytics like follows, @mentions, retweets, and video views, with the launch of Twitter Engage, a new iOS app. Real-time monitoring in your hand. The app launched on iOS in the US-only. You can hear the collective sigh of disappointment from Twitter addicts in the rest of the world. YouTube Livestreams from your mobile Livestreaming videos to YouTube from your mobile is about to be possible. YouTube announced at VidCon that it is testing livestreaming with select publishers. Available to the rest of us soon. With YouTube's huge catalogue of videos that we already have uploaded, it's going to be competitive with both Facebook Live Videos and Periscope. Does that mean that I have to buy a third phone to livestream events to all three services? Integrated Marketing Communications: Many are called. Not all answer. Gini Dietrich wrote in a blog post that, with the proliferation of platforms and the need to integrate ephemeral and chat channels, integrated marketing communications is more important than ever. We're all heard the term integrated marketing communications for over a decade. Independent agencies seem to have embraced integration. PR agencies in particular have moved to the PESO - Paid, Earned, Shared, Owned - model. So, why isn't integrated marketing communications practised each and every day? We talk about the impact of tight communications budgets and the persistence of silos within corporate marketing and communications functions. We also look at the legacy of separate profit centres in holding company agencies. The need to maximize returns for individual centres may work at odds with making integrated marketing communications a daily way of life for people working in holding company networks.

Direct download: IPR448.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:28am EDT

Inside PR 447: The Future of Social

#IPRMustKnow Sponsored Content on Facebook Instant Articles Screenshot 2016-07-03 10.33.45Neiman Labs reports that two heavyweight traditional news outlets, the Washington Post and The Atlantic, have begun running sponsored content in their Facebook Instant Articles. Happily, the illustration in the Nieman Labs story suggests that the content will be clearly labelled as "Sponsor Content." I tried to verify that by reviewing my own newsfeed. However, I couldn't find a single sponsored article from either the Washington Post or The Atlantic. That makes me think that either this sponsored content is so far very rare or Facebook is geotargeting the ads and my Canadian IP address puts me outside of the target area for them. Jason Keath, Founder of Social Fresh Jason Keath is the CEO of Social Fresh, which recently released The Future of Social, a report based on research involving over 500 social media managers and executives. Gini tracked him down and interviewed him about the report and the lessons we can take from it. Among the highlights: Companies that invest in social media tools achieve a greater return than those who don't. 95% of respondents using social media software report a positive ROI on their social media activities vs. 63% who are not investing in tools. Social media is best at connecting with existing audiences, customers, strongest leads, fans and stakeholders. Building awareness through social media can be an expensive proposition. To increase leads and sales, focus more time on fewer pieces of content. For example, Social Fresh invests heavily both in their research and the conference. This enables them to stand out by being deeper and offering more unique insights. Take your audience up the commitment curve. Ask little of them at the beginning. Reading a post. Downloading a paper. Registering. Then work them up the curve to larger commitments. Instagram is on the verge of leapfrogging LinkedIn and Twitter to become the second largest ad platform. Marketers report satisfaction with the results they are achieving with video content and they plan to increase their commitment to it in the coming year. If you're interested in more info about this year's Social Fresh conference, it will be held August 18 to 21 in Orlando. Discounted registration is available until August 1.

Direct download: IPR447.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:26pm EDT

Inside PR 446: Bad news for independent podcast creators

Is podcasting on the verge of tipping from a creator-driven medium to an advertiser-driven channel? UNU predicts the trends. Microsoft gets LinkedIn. And crises bring out the best in both social and mainstream media. Gini Dietrich, Martin Waxman and Joseph Thornley tackle these topics and more in this week’s Inside PR podcast. #IPRMustKnow Midroll acquires Stitcher A big deal by podcasting standards. Podcast advertising broker Midroll has acquired Stitcher. I think that independent podcasters have reason to worry that, if successful, Midroll/Stitcher will do to podcasting what Facebook did to the open Web. Martin and Gini are still making up their minds about this. Whatever your view, if you care about podcasting, this is an #IPRMustKnow. Who knew UNU? UNU is a site that uses the wisdom of the crowd to answer questions and predict trends. Very 2008. Microsoft acquires LinkedIn The news that Microsoft is acquiring LinkedIn broke just before we recorded this episode. So here you get our first impressions of the potential benefits and downsides of Microsoft's integration of LinkedIn with its Office suite. Crisis brings out the best in us Finally, in the wake of the Orlando shootings, we reflect on the current state of crisis communications, how news flows through social media and the important role of mainstream media to establish context, discern authoritative, credible witness testimony and curate the reports from social media.

Direct download: IPR446.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00pm EDT